What’s Your Big Data Idea?

And what are you doing about it?

“If a 15-year old who didn’t even know he had a pancreas can develop a sensor for pancreatic cancer that costs 3 cents and [takes] 5 minutes to run, imagine what those additional 3.5 billion people and just about anyone can do,” Jack Andraka told me in an interview following his speech at the recent TEDx SanJose event as I was sipping my morning green coffee.

Speaking on stage at TEDxSanJose December 1, 2012, young scientist described his cancer detection breakthrough. Andraka created a dipstick sensor using diabetic test paper to detect mesothelin, a protein associated with pancreatic cancer, in blood or urine. It has achieved 90 percent accuracy in tests and proved to be 28 times faster, 28 times less expensive and over 100 times more sensitive than current tests.
Speaking on stage at TEDxSanJose December 1, 2012, young scientist described his cancer detection breakthrough. Andraka created a dipstick sensor using diabetic test paper to detect mesothelin, a protein associated with pancreatic cancer, in blood or urine. It has achieved 90 percent accuracy in tests and proved to be 28 times faster, 28 times less expensive and over 100 times more sensitive than current tests.

I walked with Jack down the halls of Intel, where engineers, computer scientists and researchers have played a key role in creating the technologies that Jack uses as if they were as accessible as air. I though that if healthcare is to become the next space race, it will require emphatic, big idea chasing wunderkinds like Jack, the 15-year-old has been called the Thomas Edition of our age, a science prodigy and genius ahead of his time for inventing a faster, cheaper, more reliable way to detect pancreatic cancer.

In the interview captured with my iPhone 5, Jack told me that now he is teaming with two other award-winning teens to develop a disease diagnosis device the size of a smartphone to compete for the $10 million X Prize.

Now that’s drive and inspiration.

Here’s my full story for Intel Free Press: Big Data Key to Disease Detection Quest.

The Intel Reader – Accessories, Anecdotes

This is a video I shot with a great guy, Ben Foss, from Intel’s Digital Health Group.  I also edited a shorter version here.
Ben invited me to his and gave me a first-hand look at the The Intel Reader,which takes pictures of text and read it aloud.
It’s designed to provide access to printed text for people with dyslexia, low vision or blindness.
Intel’s Digital Health Group researched and designed the mobile Intel Reader, which is built on the Intel Atom processor and run on the Moblin operating system.
I got to attend the San Francisco briefing today, where I got to see a few great tech writers from sites like VentureBeat, Ubergizmo, TechPulse360 and SiliconValleyWatcher.
Intel Reader - First Prototype and First Product
Intel Reader - First Prototype and First Product
During the briefing, Ben showed the first prototype design, so I shot this photo showing the idea evolve into reality – and a set of photos here.
My take:  it’s interesting to learn about the blend of people and technology research that went into making the device.  It is purpose built and intended to assist people who have trouble reading text.  The ability to “on-the-spot” snap a photo of a newspaper, magazine or voter booklet and have the text read back to you slow or super fast is amazing.
And the fact that you can create a collection of documents and mp3 audio files for sharing (appropirately, not for commercial uses) makes this device ripe for our times.
I think it will help bring together young and older people who need help reading text — people with dyslexia, weak eye sight or other forms of blindness.

 

 

 

 

 

Tech Helping Nurses, Help People

[podtech content=http://media1.podtech.net/media/2007/02/PID_002039/Podtech_Intel_UCSF_Motion_Device.flv&postURL=http://www.podtech.net/home/technology/2182/hospitals-ready-for-c5&totalTime=352000&breadcrumb=3F34K2L1]

Funny when I see stories like this, I feel like this is how things really are.  But not so.  In this video commissioned by Intel, you can see real progress in getting technology suited for health experts.  This is inspiring, seeing people working together to help so many others.  We’ll see how this device and other digital technologies improve over time, and how if they can improve healthcare here in the U.S. and around the world.