Worth it – Camogli, Liguria, Italy | Landscape Photography by Paolo De Faveri


Camogli is a beautiful small town of the Ligurian coast, one of the many medieval villages you can find along the coast between Genoa and La Spezia.
Via paolodefaveri.photoshelter.com

In Italy’s Aeolian Islands, nature’s starkness captivates – The Seattle Times

Via Scoop.itMovin’ Ahead

In Italy’s Aeolian Islands, nature’s starkness captivatesThe Seattle TimesAs I watched the sun set from my terrace on the west coast of Salina, one of Italy’s Aeolian Islands, I marveled that the stone headrest…
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Pigeon Point Lighthouse, Northern California, My Flickr Photo Set

On November 13, 2010, we hopped in the VW at 3:30 p.m. And headed toward Half Moon Bay. It was a spectacular day along the rugged Northern California coast. A magical sunset led us to the Pigeon Point Lighthouse along with about 2,000 other people, including 100s of Photographers. All gathered to celebrate the anniversary of one of the oldest, tallest lighthouses on the West Coast.

I was able to capture some of the stunning visuals with the Canon G9 fitted with a wide-angle lens.

More from the State Parks’ Website:

Perched on a cliff on the central California coast, 50 miles south of San Francisco, the 115-foot Pigeon Point Lighthouse, one of the tallest lighthouses in America, has been guiding mariners since 1872. Its five-wick lard oil lamp, and first-order Fresnel lens, comprised of 1,008 prisms, was first lit at sunset, November 15, 1872. The lens stands 16 feet tall, 6 feet in diameter, and weighs 8,000 pounds. It sits in a lantern room that had been constructed at the Lighthouse Service’s general depot in New York before being shipped around the Horn. Although the original Fresnel lens is no longer in use, the lighthouse is still an active U.S. Coast Guard aid to navigation using a 24 inch Aero Beacon.

http://m.flickr.com/#/photos/voltarkk/sets/72157625387502946/

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Amalfi and Capri, Italy 2010

Here is a collection of Amalfi coast “being there” YouTube video clips and photos in slideshow from Flickr.

For our 10th wedding anniversary, my wife and kids revisited familiar sacred and new places from Rome down to Calabria, Italy.

I created a PearlTree collection of sites that we explored while planning our trip — this mostly looks at Umbria and Amalfi Coat.  We arrived by rented car at the seaside, cliff nestled city of Amalfi.  We stayed at the Amalfi Hotel (here is my Trip Advisor review on Digg), where the we had a killer room with a balcony view out to the Duomo.  Here’s an excerpt on the Duomo from Wikipedia

At the top of a staircase, Saint Andrew’s Cathedral (Duomo) overlooks the Piazza Duomo, the heart of Amalfi. The cathedral dates back to the 11th century; its interior is adorned in the late Baroque style with a nave and two aisles divided by 20 columns.

The gold caisson ceiling has four large paintings by Andrea d’Aste. They depict the flagellation of Saint Andrew, the miracle of Manna, the crucifixion of Saint Andrew and the Saint on the cross. From the left hand nave there is a flight of stairs which leads to the crypt. These stairs were built in 1203 for Cardinal Pietro Capuano, who, on 18 May 1208, brought Saint Andrew’s remains to the cathedral from Constantinople.

The bronze statue of Saint Andrew in the cathedral was sculpted by Michelangelo Naccherino, a pupil of Michelangelo; also present are Pietro Bernini marble sculptures of St. Stephen and St. Lawrence.

In 1206 Saint Andrew‘s relics were brought to Amalfi from Constantinople by the Pietro Capuano following the Sack of Constantinople (an event of the 4th Crusade) after the completion of the town’s cathedral.[4] The cathedral contains a tomb in its crypt that it maintains still holds a portion of the relics of the apostle. A golden reliquary which originally housed his skull and another one used for processions through Amalfi on holy days can also be seen.

Amalfi is easy going and not over luxurious.  It is authentic and picturesque and remarkably squeezed into sky-reaching cliffs yet port-side so you can easily ferry north to Positano, Sorrento and the magical island of Capri.  And if you can, visit nearby Ravello.

The ferry from Amalfi to Capri is not expense or cheap — around $25 per person — but it’s spectacular!  One of the mose memorable views is pulling into spectaluar, colorful Positano.

On the ferry, a cultured tour guide asked if we’d join his group of families and couples on a relaxing, but extensive tour up from the port to Capri then climb up, across the Mamma Mia cliff-haning narrow road to Anacapri.  This was the best decision, as we were traveling under the hot sun with two children.  We did have time afterward to take a cruise around the whole island (highly recommended) but we decided to people watch at the port = good choice!  We got to take in the real beauty and bustle — comings and goings — of the island as young gorgeous women and loving couples strolled by without a care in the world.

Now to the eye candy I capture:

Amalfi and Capril Italy 2010 , posted with vodpod

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