What’s Your Big Data Idea?

And what are you doing about it?

“If a 15-year old who didn’t even know he had a pancreas can develop a sensor for pancreatic cancer that costs 3 cents and [takes] 5 minutes to run, imagine what those additional 3.5 billion people and just about anyone can do,” Jack Andraka told me in an interview following his speech at the recent TEDx SanJose event as I was sipping my morning green coffee.

Speaking on stage at TEDxSanJose December 1, 2012, young scientist described his cancer detection breakthrough. Andraka created a dipstick sensor using diabetic test paper to detect mesothelin, a protein associated with pancreatic cancer, in blood or urine. It has achieved 90 percent accuracy in tests and proved to be 28 times faster, 28 times less expensive and over 100 times more sensitive than current tests.
Speaking on stage at TEDxSanJose December 1, 2012, young scientist described his cancer detection breakthrough. Andraka created a dipstick sensor using diabetic test paper to detect mesothelin, a protein associated with pancreatic cancer, in blood or urine. It has achieved 90 percent accuracy in tests and proved to be 28 times faster, 28 times less expensive and over 100 times more sensitive than current tests.

I walked with Jack down the halls of Intel, where engineers, computer scientists and researchers have played a key role in creating the technologies that Jack uses as if they were as accessible as air. I though that if healthcare is to become the next space race, it will require emphatic, big idea chasing wunderkinds like Jack, the 15-year-old has been called the Thomas Edition of our age, a science prodigy and genius ahead of his time for inventing a faster, cheaper, more reliable way to detect pancreatic cancer.

In the interview captured with my iPhone 5, Jack told me that now he is teaming with two other award-winning teens to develop a disease diagnosis device the size of a smartphone to compete for the $10 million X Prize.

Now that’s drive and inspiration.

Here’s my full story for Intel Free Press: Big Data Key to Disease Detection Quest.

Lenovo Yoga Plays Hard to Get

yogaHoliday season can be a frenzied time with desires, obligations and talk about winners and losers of the year. With so much clamoring for our attention, things that we really want often slip out of reach.

Despite the business press bashing Best Buy success, or lack there of, my Intel Free Press team did some gumshoe reporting to see if one particular new transformable computer was hot on people’s wishlist.

The Yoga is a full-fledged Ultrabook and tablet in one device

The Lenovo IdeaPad 13 “Yoga,” an Ultrabook that converts into a tablet, was out of stock at several Best Buy stores across the U.S.

“We don’t comment on specific products, but I can tell you that it [the Lenovo Yoga] has been one of our best sellers from a Windows 8 perspective. There’s been a ton of interest. It’s a really cool form factor and product and it’s one you really need to see in person to understand what it can do for you.”

Haydock said they were working to increase inventory in time for the holidays. “We’re doing everything we can in terms of working with Lenovo to increase inventory in stores.”

Anyone else struggling to find a Lenovo Yoga for the holidays?

Digital Arts Renaissance in the Cloud

English: Cloud Computing Image
Image via Wikipedia

In the final weeks of 2011, I drove to Berkeley to interview the founder and digital artists at McNeil Studio to hear first-hand about their first experience using cloud computing services to create a fast-moving animation based on paper origami designs.

I shot a video and wrote this article for Intel Free PressCloud Computing Democratizes Digital Animation — focusing on the impact of cloud computing — paying for on-demand supercomputer power from datacenters owned by Amazon.  The story also appears in Silicon Valley Watcher.

The idea of sending pieces of a render job out to different computers to crunch was novel and felt somewhat risky, but the results, the speed and the cost all had the McNeil Studio team singing the praises of Amazon’s Elastic Cloud Computing service.

I was also drawn into the actual creative process and how they turned
paper origami figurines into an engaging animated story for my employer,
Intel, which wanted to redesign its consumer technology website with
examples of how people can use their computer to do amazing, dazzling
things in life.

I crack up at the penguin scene.

The final version is at Intel’s Unfold What’s Possible site.

Intel: A Look Back on the Early Years

Via Scoop.itMovin’ Ahead

On the 40th Anniversary of the Microprocessor, a Tour of the Company Photo Archive Offers a Glimpse of Intel as it was in the Early 1970s(Flickr photo)Intel employees gather outside the new Santa Clara, Calif.
Via newsroom.intel.com

Intel: A Look Back on the Early Years

Via Scoop.itMovin’ Ahead

On the 40th Anniversary of the Microprocessor, a Tour of the Company Photo Archive Offers a Glimpse of Intel as it was in the Early 1970s(Flickr photo)Intel employees gather outside the new Santa Clara, Calif.
Via newsroom.intel.com

New Intel Applications Connect Smart Phones, Tablets To PCs

Via Scoop.itIntel Free Press

Up to News Stories in Free Press … The free Pair & Share PC application will be available for download from Intel in October, as will the free Pair & Share mobile applications from the Android Market and Apple iTunes Store.
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Ultrabooks Questions Answered by Intel VP Mooly Eden #IDF2011

Image posted by MobyPicture.com
– Posted using MobyPicture.com

Tablet Reference Design for future Medfield Atom SoC from Intel’s Steve Smith #IDF2011

Image posted by MobyPicture.com
– Posted using MobyPicture.com

Fireballs from @IntelLabs – tossing sensors into the blaze to gather intelligence #IDF2011

Image posted by MobyPicture.com
– Posted using MobyPicture.com

Intel’s Sean Maloney: The man who couldn’t speak – Postcards

Via Scoop.itMovin’ Ahead

Sean Maloney was on his way to being the chipmaker’s next CEO when a stroke crippled his body — and took away his ability to talk. This is the story of how he returned to work (he’s now head of Intel China) — and found his voice again.
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