Don’t Tweet from Court and Other Tips from the Digital Journalist’s Legal Guide – 10,000 Words

Via Scoop.itJournalism and Internet

Are you grappling with how to protect the identities of anonymous posters? Legally speaking, can you even do that? Now, help is just a click away. On Monday, the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press unveiled the new Digital Journalist’s Legal Guide. If you haven’t bookmarked it yet, do so. Right now.

The Reporters Committee said the guide is “designed to assist anyone who is disseminating news online, from an independent blogger to a reporter for a major media outlet, as well as media lawyers active in this area.” The interactive reference is divided into three main topics — gathering news and getting information; protecting and defending your work; and knowing the legal restrictions. Each is then broken down into specific subjects, such as libel or access to courts; questions; recent relevant news articles; links; and comments. It will also be continually updated as digital journalism evolves.
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Tech Tips from 5 Mothers Who Know Best

Mother's Day Cake
Image by no3rdw via Flickr

For Mother’s Day this year, I spent some time reaching out to five tech savvy mothers I have followed on Twitter or have known for many years through my work at Intel.

I asked @ClassyMommy @Selfishmom @Techmama @BWorley @ManicMommies  why mothers know best about tech in their household and what was on their Mother’s Day gift wish list.  Each shared some awesome quotes in this story, “Mothers Know Best About Tech.

Happy #MothersDay!

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KATU-TV Portland Visits Intel’s Social Media Center of Excellence

Local Portland TV station KATU-TV took time out to meet with my Intel pals to talk about how we team up to listen and communicate using social media.

I tried embedding the player here, but the code won’t take.  So, this is pasted from the KATU-TV Website:

What does a ‘social media guru’ do? Intel takes us behind the scenes

There are major companies out there that have entire teams dedicated to social media.  The question is – what do folks who work on those teams do all day? We find out from Intel’s Social Media Strategist, Kelly Feller.

Are PR Agencies Dead?

Brian Solis is pioneer of moving the PR industry into and beyond the PR 2.0 era. He’s also an Intel Insider, one of 10 social media advisers I get to work with. Putting Public Back in Public Relations

I shot the video (at bottom) during the “Are PR Agencies Dead?” panel at South by Southwest 2009 just days before Brian’s new book was released called “Putting Public Back in Public Relations.”

This is one for the ages, an accessible read for students studying Journalism/Public Relations in college…and a great addition to my BookStack.

The week prior to SXSW, Brian gave me some great advice about getting the @intel Twitter account started using a “curator” approach rather than sharing a persona like some of the excellent account like Zappos and ComcastCares.

Over the past three years, I’ve seen Brian grow more prolific, helping so many people with his insights about PR, about how to best use social media and networking tools and how to go off and do something wonderful with your online persona. Today, he even has an interesting Micro Disruption Theory and The Social Effect.

Brian is someone well worth any free or multitasking time you can spare.  Here is a widget that will let you follow Brian Solis’ great photography, blog and Twitter posts.

Update:  Here is a great interview of Brian Solis by Seesmic mastermind Loic Le Muer:

Why Twitter?

I’ve been using Twitter @kenekaplan since…I can’t remember. I have updated nearly 900 times using my laptop, MacBook and Blackberry…from work, home, at conferences, at work (oh, I said that!) and while traveling, even on vacation in Italy.

Now I’m about to help my Intel team start using the @Intel Twitter account. I’ve been gathering lots of great suggestions and encouragement from people inside Intel, from Intel Insiders like @briansolis and from others I follow on Twitter.

Here is a good report by Laura Fitten, a.k.a @pistachio who is writing a book on Twitter. I got to meet her for dinner at Shel Israel’s house last year. Wow, she full of energy and great stories.

John Cass and Chris Brogan @ Web 2.0

John Cass and Chris Brogan, originally uploaded by David Alston.

John Cass had some great lunchtime stories up in Sonoma County during my visit to the New Comm Forum on Thursday. He’s got a cool project looking at Fortune 500 companies and their blogging efforts. I’m looking forward to learning more from his work…and his Twitter tips!

Looks like John and Chris Brogan explored some shocking territory at Web 2.0 Expo — check out this review of Web 2.0.

Twitter Vote for Favorite Super Bowl TV Ads

Jeremiah Owyag ignited a Super Bowl Twitterthon and many are stepping in to use social media to engage more with the Super Bowl. Join the fun and Twitter your take on the TV ads hitting you on Super Bowl Sunday.

Instructions below and pre-game buzz here.

There’s just three steps:


1) Sign up:
Get a twitter account, got that? Good.

2) Send your vote to @superbowlads: When we’re watching the game in real time, simply send a reply to superbowlads. I created this Twitter account just for this virtual event. Reply to the superbowlads account, name the commerical, and give it a rating of 1-5 stars, 5 being the best.

examples:

“@superbowlads That Pepsi commercial was funny 4 stars”

“@superbowlads The Hillary Clinton advertisement was bunko 2 stars”

“@superbowlads Bud-wise-er, that was so 10 years ago, weak. 1 star”

3) See what others rated: You can then see everyone who’s rated the ads by doing a search on any of the Twitter search tools, I like Terraminds. See this example, it’s showing all the people who have replied to superbowlads.

My friend Rohit also is rallying people to engage online in new ways with the Super Bowl.

How to Twitter Better

Jeremiah Owyang (on Twitter)was the first to really explain how people at Intel could use Twitter for events like the Intel Developer Forum. He gave great examples and then several os us followed his advice and on-going commentary. But not many of us are — other than Josh Bancroft, that I know of — seem to be Twittering with real savvy. Here are highlights from Jeremiah’s post about how he reached the top ranks on Twitter.

“…focus on your objectives, what is it that you’re trying to accomplish, if you’re just trying to keep track of your friends or immediate contacts, this is not the strategy for you. This strategy only works if you are trying to gain a large following, it’s not recommended for everyone.”

1) Figure out why you want to use this tool. Is there a reason, an objective? For me it was to have greater reach in listening and in talking to others, and to really, really know Micromedia and how to use it. Being popular really isn’t a great objective, but being meaningful to your specific network is much more important.

2) Integrate it throughout your online experience. You’ll notice that I ask people to add me from various posts, have it listed in my side role and on my facebook account. It’s available for anyone that’s looking.

3) Add people back. I follow everyone that follows me, I’m following more people than are following me, and that’s a sign that you want to listen to what others have to say. Sadly, it’s a lot to digest so I end up scanning conversations. Go back to number 1, and figure out what your objective is first.

4) Add value when you tweet. I’ve given up on my google reader link blog, instead, I leave links to what I think is interesting during the day. Since I consume a lot of content, I’m acting like a filter. Most who know me know that my focus is on social media + marketing. Last week’s twitter storm was a rare opportunity to connect folks, keep listening to find an opportunity to help the larger group.

5) Ask questions. I didn’t realize this was going to be one of the largest attributes on tweeterboard, so I got lucky. I find Twitter a useful tool to get information back from people, so I like to ask a lot of questions. I learn a lot this way, in many ways, this is an example of social search.